Chemosynthesis In Sulfur Bacteria

Chemosynthesis In Sulfur Bacteria-85
Just a few decades ago, submersibles and remote sensing technologies allowed scientists to visit the farthest reaches of the ocean for the very first time.

Just a few decades ago, submersibles and remote sensing technologies allowed scientists to visit the farthest reaches of the ocean for the very first time.

Three other bacteria -- Beggiatoa (white or yellow), Chlorobium (green), and Chromatium (purple and violet) -- use hydrogen sulfide as part or all or their energy source to make food; because they also require oxygen, you will find these bacteria near the surface of the sediments.

After formation of purple and green bacterial patches, black spots of hydrogen sulfide will likely appear.

Chemosynthesis can sustain life in absolute darkness.

The most extensive ecosystem based on chemosynthesis lives around undersea hot springs.

In 1880, the Russian scientist Sergei Winogradsky discovered the bacteria Beggiatoa.

These bacteria metabolize hydrogen sulfide to produce the energy for making carbohydrates.Another bacterium, Desulfovibrio, may use the waste of Clostridium as its source of carbon and Ca SO4 as an energy source.Desulfovibrio may produce the hydrogen sulfide required by the rest of the ecosystem.High temperatures and high concentrations of dissolved minerals in seawater form compounds such as hydrogen sulfide.In a biochemical process, bacteria oxidize hydrogen sulfide and use the liberated energy to produce carbohydrates (i.e., stored chemical energy).One will be kept in the dark and the other will be placed under a light source.Obtain mud from a local lake, river, or bay or estuary.It is difficult to know exactly what bacteria are actually growing in the columns.The first species may be the anaerobic (i.e., living in the absence of oxygen) bacterium Clostridium; this heterotroph (i.e., requires organic material for food) would use the straw or filter paper as a carbon source to produce food.The inner workings of these ecosystems have proved to be as unusual as their location, for they are powered not by the light of the sun but by the heat of the earth.At the heart of these deep-sea communities is a process called chemosynthesis.

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