Critical Thinking In Education

Critical Thinking In Education-71
Building on Harvard's Project Zero Visible Thinking work, we have named routines aligned with each of our constructs. Teachers then were able to teach students that whenever they were making an argument, the norm in the class was to use the routine in constructing their claim and support.The flexibility of the routine has allowed us to apply it from preschool through 8th grade and across disciplines from science to economics and from math to literacy.These two aims for education as a vehicle to promote critical thinking are based on certain assumptions.

Building on Harvard's Project Zero Visible Thinking work, we have named routines aligned with each of our constructs. Teachers then were able to teach students that whenever they were making an argument, the norm in the class was to use the routine in constructing their claim and support.The flexibility of the routine has allowed us to apply it from preschool through 8th grade and across disciplines from science to economics and from math to literacy.These two aims for education as a vehicle to promote critical thinking are based on certain assumptions.

By using this structure with a chart that can be added to throughout the year, students see the routines as broadly applicable across disciplines and are able to refine their application over time.

Assessing Critical Thinking Skills By defining specific constructs of critical thinking and building thinking routines that support their implementation in classrooms, we have operated under the assumption that students are developing skills that they will be able to transfer to other settings.

Before moving on, I want to freely acknowledge that in narrowly defining reasoning as the construction of evidence-based claims we have disregarded some elements of reasoning that students can and should learn.

For example, the difference between constructing claims through deductive versus inductive means is not highlighted in our definition.

Critical Thinking and Education One of the significant aims of education is to produce learners who are well informed, that is to say, learners should understand ideas that are important, useful, beautiful and powerful.

Another is to create learners who have the appetite the appetite to think analytically and critically, to use what they know to enhance their own lives and also to contribute to their society, culture and civilization.Teaching Critical Thinking Skills The definitions of critical thinking constructs were only useful to us in as much as they translated into practical skills that teachers could teach and students could learn and use.Consequently, we have found that to teach a set of cognitive skills, we needed thinking routines that defined the regular application of these critical thinking and problem-solving skills across domains.However, by privileging a definition that has broad applicability across disciplines, we are able to gain traction in developing the roots of critical thinking.In this case, to formulate well-supported claims or arguments.Critical thinking involves logic as well as creativity.It may involve inductive and deductive reasoning, analysis and problem-solving as well as creative, innovative and complex approaches to the resolution of issues and challenges.I agree that there are domain-specific thinking skills that students should learn in each discipline.However, I also believe that there are several generalizable skills that elementary school students can learn that have broad applicability to their academic and social lives. We began this work by first defining what we mean by critical thinking.However, we recognized both the importance and the challenge of gathering reliable data to confirm this.With this in mind, we have developed a series of short performance tasks around novel discipline-neutral contexts in which students can apply the constructs of thinking.

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